Ransomware

Why you need ransomware protection

Protect your computers …
MALWAREBYTES 3 & ESET Internet Security

MalwareWhy you need ransomware protection
In 2016, the U.S. Department of Justice revealed that the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) had received nearly 7,700 public complaints regarding ransomware since 2005, totaling $57.6 million in damages. Those damages include ransoms paid—generally $200 to $10,000, according to the FBI—as well as costs incurred in dealing with the attack and estimated value of data lost. In 2015 alone, victims paid over $24 million across nearly 2,500 cases reported to the IC3.

Reports of two massive, global ransomware attacks are dominating the news. As workers in Europe are heading home for the weekend, ransomware is shutting down their systems. Here’s what we know so far.

The ransomware is spread using a known, and patched, vulnerability (MS17-010) that came from a leaked NSA set of exploits that we reported on our blog in April. Our research shows the encryption is done with RSA-2048 encryption. That means that decryption will be next to impossible, unless the coders have made a mistake that we haven’t found yet.

The demanded ransom of $300 per device and the potential risks to the public that come with the targets being big utility and healthcare companies seem to be in shrill contrast. We can only hope that the companies that were hit will be able to get their backups deployed quickly and can start the recovery from this cyberattack.

Computer DangerProtection
Consumers and businesses alike should be sure their systems and software are updated with all current patches in order to stop the spread of infection. Both our consumer product, Malwarebytes, and our business product, Malwarebytes Endpoint Security, already provide proactive protection against this threat. Malwarebytes signature-less anti-exploit technology blocks the infection vector, while our anti-malware technology blocks the payload pre-execution. Our anti-ransomware technology prevents users’ files from being encrypted and will stop any future unknown ransomware variants. Malwarebytes combines multiple security layers with the best-informed telemetry to block an attacker at every stage of the kill chain.

https://www.malwarebytes.com/

https://www.eset.com/us/

JungleComputer.com

Top 10 Online Threats

Jungle ComputerThe strategies hackers use to break into your site can be complicated but the results are usually pretty simple; lost revenue.

Here are the 10 most common threats identified by the Open Web Application Security Project:

1. Injection.

It’s not uncommon for web applications to have injection flaws, especially SQL injection flaws. A hacker who finds one will send malicious data as part of a command or query. The attacker’s message tricks the app into changing data or executing a command it was not designed to obey.


2. Cross-site Scripting.

Cross-site Scripting flaws occur whenever an application sends user-supplied data to a web browser without validating it first. Hackers use these flaws to hijack users away from the site or deface it, thereby costing the site owner in lost business.


3. Insecure Direct Object References.

Applications that lack checks to verify a user is authorized to view particular content can be manipulated to access private data.


4. Broken Authentication.

When account credentials and session tokens aren’t properly protected, hackers can assume users’ identities online.


5. Cross-site Request Forgery (CSRF).

A CSRF attack tricks unknowing site visitors into submitting forged HTTP requests via image tags, XSS, or other techniques. If the user is logged in, the attack succeeds.


Jungle Computer Repair6. Security Misconfiguration.

Security misconfiguration flaws give hackers unauthorized access to system data via default accounts, unused pages, unpatched flaws, unprotected files and directories.


7. Insecure Cryptographic Storage.

Many web applications don’t do enough to protect sensitive data such as credit card numbers, Social Security numbers and login credentials . Thieves may use this data for identity theft, credit card fraud or other crimes.


8. Failure to Restrict URL Access.

Often an app will protect sensitive interactions by not showing links or URLs to unauthorized users. Attackers use this weakness to access those URLs directly in order to carry out unauthorized actions.


9. Insufficient Transport Layer Protection.

Applications often fail to authenticate, encrypt and protect the confidentiality of network traffic. Some use weak algorithms, expired or invalid certificates or use them incorrectly. This allows hackers to “eavesdrop” on online exchanges. An SSL Certificate typically neutralizes this threat.


10. Invalidated Redirects & Forwards.

Web applications often redirect or forward legitimate users to other pages and websites, using insecure data to determine the destination. Attackers use this weakness to redirect victims to phishing or malware sites, or use forwards to open private pages.

https://www.secureserver.net/security/malware-scanner.aspx?ci=89298&prog_id=270511

Removal Tools

Need to uninstall a program that doesn’t show-up in the control panel?
See below …

Remove before flightAntivirus Removal Tools:

Norton Removal Tool
McAfee Removal Tool
List of Removal Tools

AntiSpyware/AntiMalware Tools:

MalwareBytes Program
SuperAntiSpyware Program
MalwareBytes Anti-Rootkit


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Double Agent, Malware replaces Antivirus

Double Agent: A recently disclosed zero-day vulnerability in Microsoft’s application verifier can lead to malware completely destroying and replacing your Antivirus (security) program. Avast, Norton, Kaspersky, Bitdefender and many other major vendors are affected.

Malwarebytes Premium v3 Beta Review

Malwarebytes Premium v3 claims to replace your traditional Antivirus program with multi-layered protection, going out of add-on or second opinion scanner territory.

How will it hold up against the onslaught of malware during this test as a standalone?