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Cradlepoint NetCloud Engine

Cradlepoint NetCloud: Securely Connecting People, Places and Things with 4G LTE, SD-WAN and Cloud Services …

Jungle Computer is a Cradlepoint Reseller …
Distributed and mobile enterprises across many industries are embracing cloud, mobile, and Internet of Things (IoT) technologies to increase business agility, empower distributed workforces, and gain operational insights—driving the need for always-connected people, places, and things.

As a result, an increasing amount of enterprise network traffic is moving off private IP networks and onto the public Internet. The Cradlepoint NetCloud platform is designed specifically for this new “Interprise” era and allows companies to deploy private cloud networks over wired and wireless broadband Internet services for branch, mobile workforce, vehicle, and IoT networks.

Jungle Computer
67 – 69 Public Square
6th Floor
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania
18701-2500

Talk to a Jungle Computer Professional …
570.970.6555 | PHONE
info@junglecomputer.com

Another WILD Software Recommendation

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SecurityA secure, digital vault for protecting your private details.

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So What Is Malware

Jungle ComputerSo what is malware? It comes in a bewildering variety of forms. Computer viruses are probably the most familiar type of malware so named because they spread by making copies of themselves. Worms have a similar property. Other types of malware, such as spyware, are named for what they do: In the case of spyware, it transmits personal information, such as credit card numbers.
So after asking “What is malware?” the next logical questions are, “who is creating it, and why?” The days when most malware was created by teenage pranksters are long gone. Malware today is largely designed by and for professional criminals.

These criminals may employ a variety of sophisticated tactics. In some cases, as technology site Public CIO notes, cybercriminals have even “locked up” computer data making the information inaccessible then demanded ransom from the users to get that data back.

But the main risk that cyber criminals pose to heavy computer users is stealing online banking information such as banking and credit card accounts and passwords. The criminal hackers who steal this information may then use it to drain your account or run up fraudulent credit card bills in your name. Or they may sell your account information on the black market, where this confidential information fetches a good price.

learn more


Jungle Computer
67 – 69 Public Square
6th Floor
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania
18701-2500

Talk to a Jungle Computer Professional …
570.970.6555 | PHONE
info@junglecomputer.com

Pennsylvania Contractor License:
# PA114006

Basics Computer Security

The basics of computer security, and how to make sure you’re protect.

Let’s cover computer security.

The first thing we’re going to talk about is something called a dictionary attack which has to do with your passwords. When creating your passwords, some sites require extremely specific and complicated passwords, which is actually a bit unnecessary. The type of attacks they’re trying to guard you from are dictionary attacks.

Dictionary attacks are programmed to try every word in the dictionary, or in its own database of common words and passwords, as the password for a large mass of usernames. If your password is Kangaroo, they’re probably going to break into your account. Most passwords aren’t this simple, but that doesn’t matter. They attack such a massive amount of accounts that they only need a few passwords that are relatively simple. When creating a password, you want to use different cases, numbers, and symbols, but one of the most effective ways to create a good password is to throw some random letters in there (ex: kangarooSyCA67). Also, stay away from sequential numbers.

SecurityPhishing, another thing to watch out for, is emails or webpages that mimic other valid sites to try and trick people into entering their personal information, though the site truly isn’t connected to the site it’s trying to mimic. In general, two ways to safeguard from these attacks are checking the address in the browser and to open a new browser and go to the website that is claiming to contact you.

Let’s also discuss encryption and HTTPS. If you are at Starbucks trying to access your bank account, you have reason to be suspicious that someone could see and take your information. You will want to look for a green HTTPS instead of HTTP at the beginning of the web address. That means that the site you’re sending your information to is encrypting your passwords and other information, scrambling up data according to a code that only they know.

In general, whenever you’re showing private or sensitive information, check for HTTPS. A few other general tips: don’t share passwords between important accounts. If a site you use gets hacked into, your password may be compromised regardless of its strength. Also, don’t download strange files. If you don’t recognize the file type like .pdf, .txt, .jpg, be wary. Some of these files you download can be very powerful and even run your computer from the inside.

Lastly, keep your software updated, particularly software that interacts with the internet. One way that information can be compromised is when ‘bad guys’ find holes and gaps in security of older versions of software. Those bugs have been patched in newer versions, so if you keep everything updated, you’ll avoid lots of problems. These are very basic things you should know about how to keep your information safe on your computer.


Jungle Computer LLC.
67 – 69 Public Square
6th Floor
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania
18701-2500

Talk to a Jungle Computer Professional …
570.970.6555 | PHONE
info@junglecomputer.com

Top 10 Online Threats

Jungle ComputerThe strategies hackers use to break into your site can be complicated but the results are usually pretty simple; lost revenue.

Here are the 10 most common threats identified by the Open Web Application Security Project:

1. Injection.

It’s not uncommon for web applications to have injection flaws, especially SQL injection flaws. A hacker who finds one will send malicious data as part of a command or query. The attacker’s message tricks the app into changing data or executing a command it was not designed to obey.


2. Cross-site Scripting.

Cross-site Scripting flaws occur whenever an application sends user-supplied data to a web browser without validating it first. Hackers use these flaws to hijack users away from the site or deface it, thereby costing the site owner in lost business.


3. Insecure Direct Object References.

Applications that lack checks to verify a user is authorized to view particular content can be manipulated to access private data.


4. Broken Authentication.

When account credentials and session tokens aren’t properly protected, hackers can assume users’ identities online.


5. Cross-site Request Forgery (CSRF).

A CSRF attack tricks unknowing site visitors into submitting forged HTTP requests via image tags, XSS, or other techniques. If the user is logged in, the attack succeeds.


Jungle Computer Repair6. Security Misconfiguration.

Security misconfiguration flaws give hackers unauthorized access to system data via default accounts, unused pages, unpatched flaws, unprotected files and directories.


7. Insecure Cryptographic Storage.

Many web applications don’t do enough to protect sensitive data such as credit card numbers, Social Security numbers and login credentials . Thieves may use this data for identity theft, credit card fraud or other crimes.


8. Failure to Restrict URL Access.

Often an app will protect sensitive interactions by not showing links or URLs to unauthorized users. Attackers use this weakness to access those URLs directly in order to carry out unauthorized actions.


9. Insufficient Transport Layer Protection.

Applications often fail to authenticate, encrypt and protect the confidentiality of network traffic. Some use weak algorithms, expired or invalid certificates or use them incorrectly. This allows hackers to “eavesdrop” on online exchanges. An SSL Certificate typically neutralizes this threat.


10. Invalidated Redirects & Forwards.

Web applications often redirect or forward legitimate users to other pages and websites, using insecure data to determine the destination. Attackers use this weakness to redirect victims to phishing or malware sites, or use forwards to open private pages.

https://www.secureserver.net/security/malware-scanner.aspx?ci=89298&prog_id=270511